Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Is the size of the tile important?

Picking tiles;
Is the size of the tile important?

With the vast variety of tiles now available, you have more choice than ever.   This means that there are lots of decisions to be made. Colours and patterns to consider, new styles e.g. porcelain wood or even cardboard effect, as well as a range of textures and finishes to choose from. 

Most patterned tiles will be 20 x 20cm while a standard floor tile is now 60 x 60 or 60 x 120cm. In a bigger kitchen 90 x 90cm or 100 x 100cm can be a popular choice and even 100 x 300cm are being used. So does it really matter what size you choose?  Here are a few things to consider . . . . . .

Designers and architects will often tell you to go for very big formats but in reality these are more expensive and not always right for your home.  What is more important is getting the right colour and texture of tile to fit in with the look and style that you are aiming for, whether you have a country cottage, modern apartment or townhouse there are lots of options available to you.  The style, colour and finish are what you will notice first over the shape or size, this is what will tie your room together.

If you do decide to go for a large format tile then there are a few very important things that you must check.  The floor must be absolutely sound, free from cracks and completely level with no pits or dips.  Any of these can cause you problems both at the time of tiling but more importantly in the long term if not dealt with correctly in the beginning.  Get advice from a professional tiler who should know exactly what needs to be done prior to fitting.

Choose the right colour of grout to compliment the tile, this should blend in and not dominate the floor.  Finally think about the layout of the tiles, whether to lay them stacked or brickbond and whether to run them across the kitchen or up and down.  These may not seem like important decisions but really they are just as important as the tile choice itself.

Rectified or Non-rectified?  If you want a more modern look in a smaller room rather than searching for a particular size, which can limit your choices significantly, why not consider going for a rectified option or a less patterned tile.  A rectified tile has crisp, sharp edge, this allows them to be laid with a smaller grout gap and more even surface than a non-rectified tile giving a more modern sleek look.  Alternatively choose a non-rectified tile with less pattern or texture for a more modern feel.

The Exceptions
  • ·      When it comes to a metro style tile grouted in contrast shade, then yes, the size matters as this is part of the look, as does the pattern that you choose to lay them in.  Smaller tiles will give you a busier, more traditional look while slightly larger ones will look more contemporary.  When laid in herringbone a smaller brick will show much more pattern while a bigger tile will create a larger, more spaced pattern.
  • ·      Wood effect porcelain is a very popular choice, available in many sizes, textures and colours.  The size of plank that you choose plays part in the overall appearance, and effects the ways that it may be laid eg herringbone, stacked or offset, each one changing the look entirely.

  • ·      The size of the room, in very large areas you may want a much larger tile to give you that sleek, modern look.  If this is the case 80x80 and 90x90’s are popular but don’t forget that 45x90 or 60x120’s make just as much of a statement.
  • ·      Patterns and colours are often only available in particular sizes, because of the style of them this is not an issue.  They add interest to your home, giving it that personal touch, don’t let the size of these put you off, choose the one that best fits with your style and colour scheme.

In the end, go for the tile that best compliments the room, your furniture and the style that you are going for, be aware of the size and how this will work with what you are doing but don’t limit your choices by looking for a particular size, there are so many options available.


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